cooperstown-chronicles.jpg
Photo courtesy of TSN Archives/Icon SMI

Boog Powell was suggested by Favre_is_overrated_2007, a friend of mine from Sporting News.  Here are my findings. 

boog-powell.jpg
Image courtesy of Icon SMI

The Numbers
2042 Games
6681 At Bats  
.266 Batting Average
889 Runs 
1776 Hits 
270 Doubles 
11 Triples
339 Home Runs (82nd All-time)
1187 RBI 
3085 Total Bases 

Playoffs:  33 games, 33 hits in 126 at bats, 17 runs, 4 doubles, 6 HRs, and 18 RBI.

Awards
1970 MVP
4 All-Star Appearances
MVP Votes in 6 Seasons

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average – Three times
On-base % – Four times 
Slugging % - Five times (Led league in 1964)
OPS – Five times
Runs - Four times
Hits – Once
Doubles – Five times
Home Runs – Seven times
RBI – Seven times
Walks – Five times
Total Bases – Three times
Intentional Walks -Nine times
Extra-base  Hits – Three times
 
I’ll give him credit for a cool name.  He had some great seasons.  Four seasons he hit 35+ HRs (when 35 HRs were a big deal) and drove in 100+ in three years.  His finest stretch was 1969 & 1970 when he averaged .300, 36 HRs, 118 RBIs.  I’m afraid his highs weren’t enough to get him into Cooperstown.  He never scored 90 runs, he never had 170 hits, and while he displayed good HR power he never had 30 doubles.  While, I’d love to try his Boog’s BBQ, I can’t justify placing him in the Hall of Fame.

boogs-bbq.jpg

References
Baseball Reference

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey
Jim Kaat
Pete Ro$e
Shoeless Joe Jackson
Dave Concepcion
Lou Whitaker
Alan Trammell
Ron Santo
Ron Guidry
Gil Hodges
Dave Parker
Tony Mullane
Keith Hernandez
Don Mattingly
Dwight Evans
Ralph Houk (Manager)
Jimmie Dykes (Player/Manager)
Charlie Grimm (Player/Manager)
Billy Martin (Player/Manager)
Harold Baines
Gene Mauch (Manager)
Whitey Herzog (Manager)
Tom Kelly (Manager)
Joe Carter
Rusty Staub
Gary Gaetti
Jimmy Ryan
George Van Haltren
Roger Maris
Lance Parrish
Mo Vaughn
Mark Grace
Dennis Martinez
Chuck Finley
Fred McGriff
Wes Parker
Steve Finley
Orlando Cepeda
Albert Belle
Willie Randolph
Graig Nettles
Luis Gonzalez
Lefty O’Doul
Rocky Colavito

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

Let’s see who’s killin’ it in the fantasy playoffs.

Click to continue reading “Dare I Say En Fuego NBA Style Vol. 13″

 | Posted by | Categories: NBA |

Nationals Park

Click to continue reading “Fantasy Baseball Players of the Day – 3/30″

 | Posted by | Categories: MLB |

cooperstown-chronicles.jpg
Photo courtesy of TSN Archives/Icon SMI

Rocky Colavito was suggested by Favre_is_overrated_2007, a friend of mine from Sporting News.  Here are my findings. 

rocky-colavito.jpg
Image courtesy of Icon SMI – Shown with Yogi Berra.

The Numbers
1841 Games
6503 At Bats  
.266 Batting Average
971 Runs 
1730 Hits 
283 Doubles 
21 Triples
374 Home Runs (61st All-time)
1159 RBI 
3177 Total Bases 

Awards
6 All-Star Appearances
MVP Votes in 6 Seasons

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average – Twice
On-base % – Five times 
Slugging % - Eight times (Led league in 1958)
OPS – Six times
Runs - Four times
Hits – Once
Doubles – Five times
Home Runs – Nine times (Led league in 1959)
RBI – Nine times (Led league in 1965)
Walks – Seven times (Led league in 1965)
Total Bases – Eight times (Led league in 1962 & 1965)
Intentional Walks -Four times
Extra-base  Hits – Eight times (Led league in 1958 & 1959)
Games – Six times (Led league in 1961 & 1965)
At Bats – Three times

Rocky certainly could hit the ball out of the park.  He had seven seasons with 30+ HRs, including five straight 35+ HR seasons (1958-1962).  He had 11 straight seasons of 20+ HRs.  He had over 100 RBI in six seasons.  Not exactly known for his defense, he finished the 1962 season without an error.  He was wildy popular with Cleveland fans.  If his career average was better, I wouldn’t be so hesitant to make a call.  I do believe he was one of the best players of his generation, which is something I use to determine Hall of Fame worthiness.  It’s not a slam dunk, but Rocky Colavito barely slides by in my book. 

References
Baseball Reference

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey
Jim Kaat
Pete Ro$e
Shoeless Joe Jackson
Dave Concepcion
Lou Whitaker
Alan Trammell
Ron Santo
Ron Guidry
Gil Hodges
Dave Parker
Tony Mullane
Keith Hernandez
Don Mattingly
Dwight Evans
Ralph Houk (Manager)
Jimmie Dykes (Player/Manager)
Charlie Grimm (Player/Manager)
Billy Martin (Player/Manager)
Harold Baines
Gene Mauch (Manager)
Whitey Herzog (Manager)
Tom Kelly (Manager)
Joe Carter
Rusty Staub
Gary Gaetti
Jimmy Ryan
George Van Haltren
Roger Maris
Lance Parrish
Mo Vaughn
Mark Grace
Dennis Martinez
Chuck Finley
Fred McGriff
Wes Parker
Steve Finley
Orlando Cepeda
Albert Belle
Willie Randolph
Graig Nettles
Luis Gonzalez
Lefty O’Doul

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

cooperstown-chronicles.jpg
Photo courtesy of TSN Archives/Icon SMI

Lefty O’Doul was suggested by aajoe7, a friend of mine from Sporting News.  Here are my findings. 

The Numbers
970 Games
3264 At Bats  
.349 Batting Average (4th All-time)
624 Runs 
1140 Hits 
175 Doubles 
41 Triples
113 Home Runs 
542 RBI 
1736 Total Bases 

Awards
1 All-Star Appearance
MVP Votes in 3 Seasons

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average – Four times (Led league in 1929 & 1932)
On-base % – Four times (Led league in 1929)
Slugging % - Four times
OPS – Four times
Runs – Three times
Hits – Twice (Led league in 1929)
Triples – Once
Home Runs – Four times
RBI – Twice
Walks – Twice
Stolen Bases – Once
Total Bases – Four times
Games – Once
At Bats – Twice

We’re talking quality not quantity here.  In his brief career, Lefty had 120+ runs three times (152 in 1929), 200+ hits three times (254 in ’29), and hit .368 or better three times (.398 in ’29).  Honestly, his 1929 season is one of the best single-season in baseball history.  He was a manager following his baseball career winning 2000+ minor league games (2094 total, which ranks 9th all-time).  He worked with Joe DiMaggio and Willie McCovey.  He was credited with helping introduced Japan to baseball, and the Roy Hobbs character in The Natural was, in part, based on Lefty.  When I first started looking at Lefty, I thought that he wasn’t worthy of the Hall of Fame.  Had he started his career as an Outfielder rather than a pitcher, his overall numbers would have likely been good enough.  However, it’s what he did after his playing days that made me clear out a spot in Cooperstown for him.  He was an ambassador for the game.  For that we owe him the honor.

References
Baseball-reference.com
BR Bullpen

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey
Jim Kaat
Pete Ro$e
Shoeless Joe Jackson
Dave Concepcion
Lou Whitaker
Alan Trammell
Ron Santo
Ron Guidry
Gil Hodges
Dave Parker
Tony Mullane
Keith Hernandez
Don Mattingly
Dwight Evans
Ralph Houk (Manager)
Jimmie Dykes (Player/Manager)
Charlie Grimm (Player/Manager)
Billy Martin (Player/Manager)
Harold Baines
Gene Mauch (Manager)
Whitey Herzog (Manager)
Tom Kelly (Manager)
Joe Carter
Rusty Staub
Gary Gaetti
Jimmy Ryan
George Van Haltren
Roger Maris
Lance Parrish
Mo Vaughn
Mark Grace
Dennis Martinez
Chuck Finley
Fred McGriff
Wes Parker
Steve Finley
Orlando Cepeda
Albert Belle
Willie Randolph
Graig Nettles
Luis Gonzalez

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB | Tagged: |

Having the #1 pick in the draft used to be a great thing.  While it’s still nice to be able to pick anyone from the incoming class, it also comes with its problems.  Mainly, you have to rob a bank in order to pay them.  JaMarcus Russell, for example, got a cool $60 million with half of it guaranteed.  Why should someone without any experience become one of your top paid players without proving a thing? Since these rookie salaries have gotten so out of control, it impacts the type of player you take with the #1 pick.  Of the 8 picks this decade, 6 of them have been Quarterbacks.  If you go back ten years, the have been 8 QBs taken.  In the 90′s only 4 QBs were taken first overall.  Three in the 80′s.  Three in the 70′s.  Three in the 60′s.  Five in the 50′s, and three from 1936-1949.  You pay so much for these guys that you want to choose a player that is going to have a long career.  You don’t necessarily take the best player available.  Houston is the perfect example.  Although Mario Williams had a great season last year, you just know if money weren’t an issue, the Texans would have taken Reggie Bush.  Not only would he help your sputtering offense immediately, he’d help put butts in the seats and inject life into your franchise.  The Texans, however, knew Bush was going to ask for the moon so they avoided him.  The sad thing is these quarterbacks are such a risk.  Of the last 8 QBs taken #1 you have busts in David Carr and Tim Couch, the jury is still out on Alex Smith (although it’s not looking good) and JaMarcus Russell, and Michael Vick is in jail.  Your success stories are Peyton, Eli, and Carson Palmer.  That’s a ton of cash for a crap shoot. 

Another problem with the way the NFL Draft is set up is the payscales of the picks.  You have a waiting game to see what the players around you are getting, which often leads to holdouts.  Say what you will about the NBA, I like how they have the salaries slotted going into the draft.  That way you know what you’re getting.  The NFL is a little trickier because different positons receive different salaries, but they have enough lawyers and accountants to figure out how to work it out.  Here’s an idea.  Compare all of the average salaries for each position.  Whichever position has the top salary gets 100% of the slot.  If your position averages 20% less than the top position, you only get 80% of the slot. 

The monies that NFL teams are dealing with are ridiculous.  We complain about gas prices all the time, but nobody seems to care about the crazy amount of money these NFL teams bring in.  We’re the ones paying for it.  Have you seen what good NFL tickets are going for these days?  Taking a family of four could cost you $600 or more.  I’m sorry, but that’s ridiculous.  When we do complain about the NFL revenues, it’s always directed towards the players.  I understand that they are more visible (both in terms of how you associate them with the team, and all to often because they showcase their wealth), but they are only small players in the grand scheme.  It’s the owners that are raking in the big bucks.  They are rarely taken to task for it though.  We gripe about players holding out when their contracts are beyond a fantasy for most of us.  Some times, though, the owners more than have the money to pay them, and their worth to the team justifies that they are paid more.  I’ve gone out on a tangent again, but I am in the camp that says let’s look past the players for a while because we have bigger fish to fry.    To tie this back to my original point, the financial system of the NFL needs a tweak.  One of the most sensible ways would be to come up with a rookie payscale.   

 | Posted by | Categories: NFL |

Time for the 15th installment of the NFL Free Agent Report.

Click to continue reading “NFL Free Agent Report Vol. 15″

 | Posted by | Categories: NFL |

Partner of USA TODAY Sports Digital Properties