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I’ve just lobbied for Pete Ro$e, so getting on my soap box for Shoeless Joe should be much easier.  Yes, Shoeless Joe was part of the infamous Black Sox Scandal, but there is some debate of his role in it.  In that series Joe his .375, scoring five runs and driving in six more.  Furthermore, he didn’t make any errors in the series.  There is also debate as to whether or not he understood what he was getting into.  What’s not up for debate is his talent.

shoeless-joe.jpg
Photo courtesy of TSN Archives/Icon SMI 

The Numbers
.356 Batting Average (3rd All-time)
1772 Hits (in 1332 games)
873 Runs
307 Doubles
168 Triples (26th All-time)
54 Home Runs
785 RBI
202 Stolen Bases
2577 Total Bases
.423 On-base % (16th All-time)
.517 Slugging % (63rd All-time)
.940 OPS (32nd All-time)

Playoffs – .345, 9 runs, 19 hits, 3 doubles, 1 HRs, 8 RBI in fourteen games.

The Awards
MVP votes in 4 seasons
.400 season in 1911

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average - 8 times (Runner-up in ’11, ’12, ’13)
On-base % - 9 times (Led league in ‘11)
Slugging % – 9 times (Led league in ‘13)
OPS – 9 times (Led league in ’13)
Games - 4 times
At Bats – Twice
Runs - 6 times
Hits - 6 times (Led league in ’11 & ’12)
Total Bases - 7 times (Led league in ’12 & ’16)
Doubles - 6 times (Led league in ’13)
Triples - 9 times (Led league in ’12, ’16 & ’20)
Home Runs – 6 times
RBI – 8 times
Walks – Twice
Stolen Bases – Twice

References
Baseball-reference.com
Baseball Library
Baseball Reference Bullpen

The sad thing is, if he didn’t take part in the Scandal, he likely would have been one of the best players of all-time.  He was 30 when he was banished from the game he loved.  He hit .382 in his final season with 218 hits, 42 Doubles, 20 Triples, 12 Home Runs, 105 Runs and 121 RBI.  He was just entering his prime. 

The league was totally different in those days.  There was no Players Association to protect the players’ rights.  Shoeless Joe made $6000 in the 1919 season.  Accoring to an Inflation Calculator, $6000 was the equivelant of around $71,000 of 2007 dollars.  He was paid $5000 to be part of the scandal.  The White Sox took a big hit in attendance, going from 684, 521 in 1917 to 195,081.  Some suggest that Charles Comiskey passed some of the losses to his players by refusing to launder their uniforms.  The players objected to this and wore them without washing them.  From here the nickname “Black Sox” was born.   It’s hard to justify what the Black Sox members did, but judging by his stats in the World Series, I’m not sure Shoeless Joe followed through.

If you think I’m off my rocker for wanting to induct Shoeless Joe into the HOF, please let me know. 

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey
Jim Kaat
Pete Ro$e

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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This one is a little controversial.  Obviously the numbers and awards make him a shoe in.  You’re either for Rose or against Rose.  Personally, I’m for him.

pete-rose.jpg
Photo courtesy of Icon SMI

The Numbers
.303 Batting Average
3562 Games (1st All-time)
14053 At Bats (1st All-time)
4256 Hits (1st All-time)
2165 Runs (6th All-time)
746 Doubles (2nd All-time)
135 Triples (74th All-time)
160 Home Runs
1314 RBI (87th All-time)
198 Stolen Bases
1566 Walks (13th All-time)
167 Intentional Walks (26th All-time)
5752 Total Bases (7th All-time)

Playoffs – .321, 30 runs, 86 hits, 13 doubles, 2 triples, 5 HRs, 22 RBI

The Awards
1973 MVP
1963 Rookie of the Year
1975 World Series MVP
1968 Hutch Award
1969 Lou Gehrig Award
1976 Roberto Clemente Award
17 All-Star Game Appearances
2 Gold Gloves
1 Silver Slugger
MVP votes in 15 seasons

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average – 13 times (3 batting titles ’68, ’69 & ’73)
On-base % – 11 times (Led league in ’68 & ’79)
Slugging % – Twice
OPS – Three times
Games – 15 times (Led league five times)
At Bats – 18 times (Led league four times)
Runs – 15 times (Led league three times)
Hits – 17 times (Led league seven times)
Total Bases – 11 times
Doubles – 15 times (Led league five times)
Triples – 8 times
Walks – 7 times
Intentional Walks – 4 times

References
Baseball-reference.com

Like I said, his numbers and awards were enough to make him a first ballot HOFer.  His ability, drive, determination, longevity, and consistency has never been called into question.  His character has though.  His character is what has kept him from being celebrated as one of the best balleball players of all time.  Betting on baseball is against the rules.  I get that.  However, his gambling came after his career as a player.  I agree with the ban on him from being employed by Major League Baseball, but what he did as a player should not be ignored.  He earned the nickname Charlie Hustle.  He proved himself to be one of the greatest this game has ever witnessed.  There are plenty of Hall of Famers with skeletons in their closets.  Racists like Ty Cobb and Cap Anson.  Drug dealers like Orlando Cepeda.  Cheaters like Gaylord Perry.  Soon members of the steroid era will make their way into the Hall.  It’s time to let Pete Rose in as well.  Here’s the way to do it though.  Don’t have the traditional ceremony.  Don’t let him do a speech.  Just put up his bust and do a press release. 

If you think I’m off my rocker for wanting to induct Pete Rose into the HOF, please let me know. 

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey
Jim Kaat

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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Should 16 Gold Gloves be enough to get you in the Hall of Fame?  Maybe not by itself, but it should get you pretty close.  When you throw in 283 career wins, it becomes a no-brainer.

jim-kaat.jpg
Photo courtesy of John McDonough/Icon SMI

The Numbers
283 Wins (31st All-time)
625 Starts (16th All-time)
4530.3 Innings (26th All-time)
2461 Strikeouts (33rd All-time)
180 Complete Games
31 Shutouts (103rd All-time)
3.45 ERA

The Awards
3 All-Stars Appearances
1966 TSN Pitcher of the Year
16 Gold Gloves
Received MVP votes in 3 seasons
Received Cy Young votes in 1 season

Top Ten Finishes

ERA – 3 Times
Wins – 7 Times (Led league in 1966)
Win-Loss % – Twice
Starts – 8 Times (Led league in ’65 & ’66)
Innings Pitched – Six Times (Led league in ’66)
Strikeouts – Four Times
Complete Games – Four times (Led league in ’66)
Shutouts – Three times (Led league in ’62)

This one is bewildering.  He has a ton of wins, and was one of the very best fielding pitchers of all time.  He won a World Series.  To me, he’s worthy of the Hall of Fame.

References
Baseball-reference.com

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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It’s tough to decide whether Garvey was better with his stick or his glove.  He hit .300 or better seven times.  He took home four Gold Gloves.  For some reason though, he’s not a member of the Hall of Fame.

steve-garvey.jpg
Photo Courtesty of Icon SMI 

The Numbers
.294 Batting Average
8835 At Bats (70th All-time)
1143 Runs
2599 Hits (70th All-time)
3941 Total Bases (81st All-time)
440 Doubles (96th All-time)
272 Home Runs
1308 RBI (92nd All-time)
.994 Fielding % (.996% at 1st Base)

The Awards
1974 MVP
2 All-Star MVPs
2 NLCS MVPs
Roberto Clemente Award
Lou Gehrig Memorial Award
10 All-Stars Appearances
4 Gold Gloves
Received MVP votes in 9 seasons

Top Ten Finishes

Batting Average – 6 times
Slugging % – Twice
At Bats - 11 times
Runs – Twice
Hits – Ten times (Led league in ’78 & ’80)
Total Bases – Nine times
Doubles – 7 times
Triples – Once
RBI – 7 Times 

I don’t get it.  The guy could hit and was a wiz with the glove.  He was durable, consistent, and excellent.  He delivered in the playoffs (.338 BA overall – .319 in World Series play; 11 HR in 11 playoff games).  He won plenty of awards.  He should receive one more award…the ultimate one…a spot in the Hall of Fame.

References
http://www.baseball-reference.com/g/garvest01.shtml

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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Al Oliver hit .300 or better in 11 seasons (including nine of his last ten seasons).  He came up 257 hits short of a guaranteed Hall of Fame bid, but he is still worthy in my book.

al-oliver.jpg
Photo courtesy of Icon SMI

The Numbers
2743 Hits (48th All-time)
.303 Batting Average
1189 Runs
529 Doubles (30th All-Time)
219 Home Runs
1326 RBI (84th All-time)
4083 Total Bases (68th All-time)
9049 At Bats (59th All-time)

The Awards
7 All-Star Appearances
3 Silver Sluggers
Received MVP votes in 10 seasons

Top Ten Finishes

Batting Average – 9 Times (Batting Crown in ’82)
On-base % – Once
Slugging % – Twice
At Bats – Six Times
Runs – Four Times
Hits – Nine times (Led league in ’82)
Total Bases – Five Times (Led league in ’82)
Doubles – Nine Times (Led league in ’82 & ’83)
Triples – Three Times
RBI – Four Times (Led league in ’82)

The numbers speak for themselves.  Scoops could flat out hit.  He was a model of consistency for a long time.  He was a World Champion and a batting champion.  He was an All-Star and a Silver Slugger.  There’s one more title he should own.  Hall of Famer.

References
http://www.baseball-reference.com/o/oliveal01.shtml

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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1991.  Game 7.  Minnesota Twins vs. Atlanta Braves.  Jack Morris vs. John Smoltz.  In perhaps the best postseason performace of the modern era, Jack Morris throws ten innings of shutout ball to deliver a World Series to Minnesota 1-0.  That’s the stuff that legends are made of.  That’s just one reason he belongs in the Hall of Fame.  Jack Morris won World Series titles with three different teams (Detroit in ’84, Minnesota in ’91, and Toronto in ’92).  His World Series record is 3-0 with a 2.96 ERA.  He’s 6-1 in 13 career playoff starts.  He had more wins in the 80′s (162) than any other pitcher.  Dave Steib is the next closest with 140.  In my mind, he should take his place with baseball’s greats in the Hall of Fame.  His dominance is equaled by his durability.  He made over 500 consecutive starts without missing his turn in the rotation.  He also owns a no-hitter (1984 vs. the White Sox).

jack-morris.jpg
Image courtesy of Icon SMI

The Numbers
254 Wins (40th All-time)
3.90 ERA
2478 Strikeouts (31st All-time)
3824 Innings (49th All-time)
527 starts (35th All-time)
175 Complete Games
28 Shutouts

The Awards
World Series MVP
5 All-Star Appearances
Received MVP votes in 5 seasons
Recieved Cy Young votes in 7 seasons

Top Ten Finishes
Wins – 12 Times (Led league in ’81 & ’92)
ERA – Five Times
Strikeouts – 8 Times (Led league ’83)
Innings – 9 Times (Led league in ’83)
Starts – 11 Times (Led league in ’90 & ’91)
Complete Games – 10 Times (Led league in ’90)
Shutouts – 8 Times (Led league in ’86)
Winning Percentage – 5 Times

Gone are the days of 300 wins careers.  With five-man rotations, you just don’t start enough games to reach the plateau.  If the voters can’t look past not reaching that mark, starting pitching will got the way of the dinosaur in terms of the Hall of Fame.  There has to be more to it than just numbers.  If someone is a top five pitcher for  a decade with a history of big games in the postseason and unmatched durability, he’s a Hall of Famer in my book.    

References
Baseball-reference.com
The Baseball Page

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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Closers have finally started to get their due from Hall of Fame voters.  In recent years, Dennis Eckersley, Rollie Fingers, Goose Gossage, Bruce Sutter, and Hoyt Wilhelm have got the call.  Shortly after he’s eligible, I expect Mariano Rivera to be inducted as well.  What does Lee Smith have than all of those guys?  Saves.  Lee Smith trails only Trevor Hoffman (another likely HOFer) in career saves.  I’m not saying that Lee Smith is better than any of the aforementioned closers, but I am saying he’s worthy company in Cooperstown.

lee-smith.jpg
Photo courtesy of Icon SMI

The Numbers
71-92 Record
478 Saves (2nd All-time)
1022 Games (8th All-time)
1251 K’s
3.03 ERA
802 Games Finished (1st All-time)

The Awards
7 All-Star Appearances
3 Rolaid Relief Awards
Received MVP votes in 4 seasons
Recieved Cy Young votes in 4 seasons (2nd in ’91)

Top Ten Finishes

Games – Six times
Saves – Fourteen times (1st in ’83, ’91, ’92, ’94)

Hall of Fame voters have looked down on closers.  The tradition of the position doesn’t have deep roots.  However, the position isn’t going anywhere.  When you think of the Yankee’s most recent dynasty, Mariano Rivera is the second person to come to mind (after Derek Jeter) when you think of the most important pieces.  Lee Smith was given a job…to close out ball games.  He did that more often than anyone else.  He shouldn’t be punished for the changes that have been made to baseball.  The closer is a legitimate position.  Lee Smith is one of the very best to play that position.  To me that qualifies as a Hall of Famer.

References
Baseball-reference.com

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

Friday Tidbits 1/18/08

18 January 2008

New England took care of Jacksonville. Tom Brady was near perfect. Green Bay survived a bumpy start to blast Seattle. Brett Favre surpasses 5000 playoff passing yards in the process. San Diego got by Indianapolis despite two chances for Peyton Manning to send them packing. I got my popcorn ready, but Dallas and MeO won’t be moving on to the NFC title game. The G-Men took that honor. Houston named Kyle Shanahan their next Offensive Coordinator. You may know his Dad, Mike. Atlanta hired Thomas Dimitroff to be their new GM. He was responsible for scounting college players for the Patriots. Dallas LB Greg Ellis won the NFL Comeback Player of the Year. Baltimore wants Jason Garrett bad. Jerry Jones just wanted him more He’s now the highest paid assistant. I’m sure Wade Phillips feels a lot of job security. PacMoron Jones has been accused of sucker-punching a woman at a, you guessed it, strip club. Deion Branch will have knee surgery. Tennessee fired Norm Chow. Randy Moss was accused of battery on a woman. The Dolphin hired Tony Sparano as their next head coach. Kansas City hired Chan Gailey to be their new Offensive Coordinator. 

Andrew Bynum will miss two months with a knee injury. LeBron stuffed the stat sheet against Charlotte with 31 points, 19 rebounds, 8 assists, 4 steals, and 3 blocks. He also got a ticket for driving 101 mph. He topped that with a 51 point, 8 rebound, 9 assist, 3 steal effort against Memphis. His coach, Mike Brown, got a two-year extension. Chris Bosh had 40 for Toronto as Isiah benched Eddy Curry and Zach Randolph. Pao Gasol went for 43 of his own against Golden State. Gerald Wallace scored 40 against Denver in a game that saw Marcus Camby have 20 points and 23 boards. Kobe Bryant scored 48 in an overtime victory over Seattle. The Celtics lost back-to-back games. Luol Deng returned for Chicago. Nene had surgery to remove a tumor on his testicles. Hopefully, it wasn’t cancerous. Shaq is back. So is Mike Bibby. Dwight Howard had 24 points and 21 rebounds in a loss to Charlotte. Jason Kidd had 17 assists in a loss to New York. Tyson Chandler grabbed 21 boards in a win over Seattle. Denver’s Linas Kleiza scored 41 against Utah. He’ll be popular on the waiver wire. Stephon Marbury is having surgery on his ankle. Chicago’s JamesOn Curry was arrested for peeing in public. No word on whether or not he was charged with having a silly name. 

Evgeni Malkin netted a hat trick against the Rangers. Atlanta’s Marian Hossa matched him against Detroit. This week’s shutouts: Colorado’s Jose Theodore vs. Tampa, Nashville’s Chris Mason vs. Calgary. Minnesota C Mikko Koivu returned after missing 24 games with a broken leg from a slash by Vancouver D Mattias Ohlund. His teammate Defenseman Sean Hill landed on the IR with an ankle injury. Mattias was suspended four games for the cheap shot. Yeah, that seems fair. Wild lose 24 games to Vancouver’s 4. Ottawa will be without Dany Heatley for a month with a separated shoulder. Calgary signed G Curtis Joseph. San Jose D Kyle McLare will miss a few games following knee surgery. Washington will be without Michael Nylander for the rest of the year following shoulder surgery. Colorado C Paul Stastny will miss a few weeks following his appendectomy. 

St. Louis traded Scott Rolen to Toronto for Troy Glaus. Maybe a change of scenery will help the washed up third basemen. Mark McGwire should help Glaus make the transition by putting him in touch with his steroid pushers. If not, Rick Ankiel should help him out. In other steroid news, Congress wants to talk to Miguel Tejada. I think they said “Miggy, you’ve got some ‘splaining to do. They also spoke with Bud Selig and Donald Fehr. It’s fine and dandy, but don’t we have an economy, a war, rising gas prices, etc. that Congress should be worrying about. Milwaukee signed CF Mike Cameron to a one-year, $7 million deal. Atlanta traded Joey Devine to Oakland for Mark Kotsay. Seattle signed Arthur Rhodes and George Sherrill. Dan Wheeler signed with Tampa. Jon Lieber signed a one-year deal with the Cubs worth $3.5 million. Nate Robinson signed a three-year deal with Detroit worth $21.25 million. Texas signed Jason Jennings to a one-year deal. St. Louis will be without Juan Encarnacion for the whole season because of an eye injury. Butt Selig signed on for three more years. Oh joy. Hudson Street signed a one-year deal with Oakland. 

As expected, Arkansas RB Darren McFadden is turning pro. Joining him is teammate and backfield mate RB Felix Jones, Ohio State DE Vernon Gholston, West Virginia RB Steve Slaton, Michigan WR Mario Manningham, Florida State QB Xavier Lee (who is leaving after being asked to switch to TE), Cal WR DeSean Jackson, and Oregon S Patrick Chung . Ohio State LB James Laurinaitis will stay in school. Air Force signed coach Troy Calhoun to a five-year extension. Mississippi State extended coach Sylvester Crooms for two years. Buffalo extended the contract of coach Turner Gill. West Virginia wants to know where player files have gone since Rich Rodriguez’s skipped town. Ryan Mallet, who transferred from Michigan, is going to Arkansas. Hawaii’s new coach is Greg McMackin. 

Bobby Knight became the first coach with 900 wins. #5 UCLA beat #4 Washington State. Freshman Kevin Love had 27 points and 14 rebounds for the Bruins. Iowa beat #6 Michigan State 43-36. Talk about a snoozefest. Kentucky upset #12 Vanderbilt. Missouri beat #13 Texas. Cincinnati knocked off #17 Villanova. Oregon beat #23 Stanford. New Mexico State’s Herb Pope has been cleared to play as eligibility issues were solved. #16 Pitt beat #6 Georgetown. Oklahoma could be without Blake Griffin for a month with a knee injury. Boston College beat #24 Miami. Texas Tech beat #9 Texas A & M. UMass upset #18 Dayton. Temple beat #20 Xavier. UCLA has asked fans to leave John Wooden alone. Vance Walberg resigned as Pepperdine coach. #7 Tennessee beat #14 Vanderbilt. Cleveland State beat #12 Butler. Louisville pounde #13 Marquette. St. Louis beat #21 Rhode Island, which is a far cry from when they scored 20 in an entire game a week ago.

That concludes the Tidbits. As always, feel free to add any stories you liked this week in sports or discuss any of the stories I mentioned.

 | Posted by | Categories: MLB, NBA, NFL | Tagged: NCAA, NHL |

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If you look up to see who has the most hits by a catcher, you may be surprised by the answer.  Obviously, the title of the entry tips my hand, but if you haven’t figured it out yet, the answer is Ted Simmons.  Ted played 21 seasons with St. Louis, Milwaukee, and the Braves.  He will have to wait for the Veterans Committee to induct him, but I think he should already be in.

ted-simmons.jpg
Photo courtesy of Icon SMI

The Numbers
.285 Batting Average (hit .300 or better seven times)
1074 Runs
2472 Hits (90th All-time)
248 Home Runs
483 Doubles (61st All-time)
1389 RBI (68th All-time)

The Awards
1 Silver Sluggers
8 All-Star Appearances
Received MVP votes 7 seasons

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average – Six times (2nd in ’75)
On Base % – Four times
Slugging % – Four times
OPS – Five times
Hits – Four times
Doubles – Eight Times
RBI – Six Times
Total Bases – Four Times

References
Baseball-reference.com

Simmons wasn’t great defensively, which hurts his case as a catcher.  However, he was a major force on offense.  He has more hits and doubles than any Hall of Fame catcher.  Only Yogi Berra has more RBIs.  It’s time to let this member of Harvey’s Wallbangers in the Hall of Fame.

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

cooperstown-chronicles.jpg
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Judging by how close he came (16 votes shy), I assume that Jim Rice will meet the requirements next year to be enshrined in Cooperstown. Until then I get to plead my case for his induction.

The Numbers
.298 Batting Average
1249 Runs
2452 Hits (97th All-time)
382 Home Runs (53rd All-time)
1451 RBI (54th All-time)

The Awards
1978 MVP
2 Silver Sluggers
8 All-Star Appearances
6 Times in Top 5 in MVP Voting

Top Ten Finishes
Batting Average – Six times
On Base % – Twice
Slugging % – Eight times (Led league in 77 & 75)
OPS – Six times (Led league in 78)
Runs – Six times
Hits – Eight times (Led league in 78)
Doubles – Three Times
Triples – Four Times (Led league in 78)
Home Runs – Seven Times (Led league in 77, 78 & 83)
RBI – Nine Times (Led league in 78 & 83)
Total Bases – Nine Times (Led league in 77, 78, 79 & 83)

His 406 total bases in 1978 were more than anyone since 1948 (Stan Musial) until the Steroid Era where there have been five higher totals (Sosa twice, Luis Gonzalez, Barry Bonds, and Larry Walker). He is also the only player to lead the league in Home Runs, Triples, and RBIs in the same season. Rice was the first person with three straight 200 hit, 35 home run seasons.

If a wrist injury didn’t cost him the 1975 postseason, who knows how the story would have gone. He could have been the difference to help the Red Sox knock off the Big Red Machine. Had that happened, I’m sure Rice would have received the call years ago. Hopefully, next year is the one.

References
http://www.baseballlibrary.com/ballplayers/player.php?name=Jim_Rice_1953
http://www.baseball-reference.com/r/riceji01.shtml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Rice

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso

 | Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |

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