Cooperstown Chronicles – Charlie Grimm

Feb 16, 2008

First, I’m going to do my part to help Save the Hall of Fame Game.   If you think a tradition that dates back seventy years is important, then Sign the Petition. OK, on to the matter at hand.

cooperstown-chronicles.jpg 
Photo courtesy of TSN Archives/Icon SMI 

Like Jimmie Dykes, Charlie had success as both a player and as a manager.  His numbers alone don’t merit a HOF berth, but combined with his managerial prowess, I believe he has what it takes.

As a player he racked up 2299 hits (132nd All-time), scored 908 runs, had 394 doubles (161st), 108 triples, 79 home runs, 1078 RBI (194th), with a .290 batting average and a .397 slugging percentage.  He received MVP votes in 1925, 1929, and 1931.  His top ten finishes include Batting Average (Twice), On-base %, Games (4 times), Hits, Doubles, Triples (Four times), and RBI (twice).  He was great with his glove as well, winning nine fielding titles at first base.

His didn’t win a World Series as he played on the Cubs the majority of his career, but he did excel in the nine World Series games he played in.  He had 12 hits in 33 at bats (.364) with 4 runs, 2 doubles, 1 HR, and 5 RBI.

He also was very successful as a manager.  He went 1287-1067 (.547) with four NL Pennants (’32, ’35, ’38 & ’45).  In his first nine years as manager he went 706-494 (.588) with those four pennants.

Jolly Cholly played 20 seasons and manager 19 more.  He dedicated his life to the game.  When you add his accomplishments as a player to his accomplishments as a manager, I think it’s plain to see that Charlie Grimm belongs in the Hall of Fame.

References
Baseball-reference.com
Baseball Library

Past Chronicles
Bert Byleven
Andre Dawson
Dale Murphy
Mark McGwire
Bobby Matthews
Tommy John
Buck O’Neill & Minnie Minoso
Jim Rice
Ted Simmons
Lee Smith
Jack Morris
Al Oliver
Steve Garvey
Jim Kaat
Pete Ro$e
Shoeless Joe Jackson
Dave Concepcion
Lou Whitaker
Alan Trammell
Ron Santo
Ron Guidry
Gil Hodges
Dave Parker
Tony Mullane
Keith Hernandez
Don Mattingly
Dwight Evans
Ralph Houk (Manager)
Jimmie Dykes (Player/Manager)

Posted by | Categories: Cooperstown Chronicles, MLB |
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18 Responses so far | Have Your Say!

  1. Pops
    February 17th, 2008 at 1:22 pm #

    Jolly Cholly. What a nickname.

  2. Ryan Lester
    February 17th, 2008 at 3:36 pm #

    Yep

  3. Big Denny
    February 17th, 2008 at 5:44 pm #

    Who?

  4. Anonymous
    June 3rd, 2008 at 5:01 pm #

    he was my grandfather…a great man-much enjoyed entertaining people; loved the fans; loved to laugh/joke; i think his greatest lesson to me was..”never be too big to be humble and love those you are with”…”enjoy all that you do”…

  5. LestersLegends
    June 3rd, 2008 at 6:46 pm #

    very cool. thanks for sharing.

  6. Grimmfan1
    July 26th, 2008 at 8:35 am #

    I have been doing research on this man for several years. He should be in the Hall of Fame. Would love to talk to grandchild!

  7. LestersLegends
    July 26th, 2008 at 9:04 am #

    grimm – totally agree

  8. Mark in STL
    August 13th, 2008 at 9:41 pm #

    I grew up across the street from Charlie Grimm’s sister in St. Louis. Charlie used to come visit and play catch with me in his sister’s front yard. He was a very nice man.

    If you research his career, he played with and against some of the game’s greatest. He was playing first base when Babe Ruth made his “called shot” in the World Series.

    Charlie’s sister gave me a team-signed baseball from the 1945 Cubs, the last Cubs team to be in the World Series, which Charlie managed.

  9. LestersLegends
    August 13th, 2008 at 10:25 pm #

    Mark – That’s awesome. Thanks for sharing. What memories those must be.

  10. Anonymous
    September 6th, 2008 at 9:20 pm #

    My only regret is that I was too young at the time to realize how many of the games greats he played with and against. I now read a lot of books about baseball in the ’20′s and ’30′s, and I would have a lot of questions for him.

    I just bought a picture of Charlie with Babe Ruth on Ebay. I am going to display it with the baseball his sister gave me.

  11. BraystreetLad
    January 3rd, 2009 at 8:57 am #

    I have to disagree with you,bud.From the articles I’ve read about Grimm,it seems that “Jolly Cholly” was regarded as just another good
    player by his peers.(Though his avuncular manner was such a refreshing change from Rogers Hornsby’s disagreeable personality(one Cub pitcher o-
    penly described Hornsby as a “p**ck),that when “The Rajah was fired in
    Aug.1932 and Grimm replaced him and the Cubbies rallied to win the ’32
    N.L. pennant-though losing the World Series to the Yankees-Hornsby’s
    former players-mates-he served as player/manager-voted him NO post-
    season money.

  12. LestersLegends
    January 3rd, 2009 at 10:28 am #

    2300 hits and nearly 1300 W’s. As a player no, as a manager no, but as a baseball lifer…yes.

  13. Cooperstown Chronicles - Stan Coveleski :: Elites TV
    May 13th, 2009 at 12:55 pm #

    [...] Gary Gaetti Steve Garvey Lefty Gomez* Luis Gonzalez Dwight Gooden Joe Gordon Mark Grace Bobby Grich Charlie Grimm (Player/Manager) Ron Guidry Chick Hafey* Jesse Haines* Billy Herman* Keith Hernandez Orel Hershiser [...]

  14. Cooperstown Chronicles - Waite Hoyt | 1800blogger
    May 20th, 2009 at 2:02 pm #

    [...] Gary Gaetti Steve Garvey Lefty Gomez* Luis Gonzalez Dwight Gooden Joe Gordon Mark Grace Bobby Grich Charlie Grimm (Player/Manager) Ron Guidry Chick Hafey* Jesse Haines* Billy Herman* Keith Hernandez Orel Hershiser [...]

  15. Larry Norris
    August 16th, 2009 at 10:11 am #

    We have been looking into Grimm’s life and career as part of a book project. He was a very special man from many perspectives, but people have a tendency to underestimate his contributions because he was such an affable character. He probably could have improved his statistics as well if he would have been more selective about how long he played and who he managed for — but I don’t think he was interested in history so much as living every day to the fullest.

    He was an excellent first baseman and helped solidify the Cubs infield that allowed them to win three Pennants. As a manager he was one of those rare men who was loved by his playaers as well as ownership. He was also part of special breed of men who played and managed at the same time.

    His 1945 Cubs were the last Pennant-winners for the franchise. He also was a superb Minor League Manager and manage the Boston/Milwaukee Braves. He was a larger than life guy who lightened things up for everyone around him. He was well-liked and sought after by both Wrigley and Veeck. When you look at his contribution to baseball as a manager and player, it’s pretty special.

  16. Larry Norris
    August 16th, 2009 at 10:14 am #

    We have been looking into Grimm’s life and career as part of a book project. He was a very special man from many perspectives, but people have a tendency to underestimate his contributions because he was such an affable character. He probably could have improved his statistics as well if he would have been more selective about how long he played and who he managed for — but I don’t think he was interested in history so much as living every day to the fullest.

    He was an excellent first baseman and helped solidify the Cubs infield that allowed them to win three Pennants. As a manager he was one of those rare men who was loved by his players as well as ownership. He was also part of special breed of men who played and managed at the same time.

    His 1945 Cubs were the last Pennant-winners for the franchise. He also was a superb Minor League Manager and in addition to the Cubs managed the Boston/Milwaukee Braves. He was a larger than life guy who lightened things up for everyone around him. He was well-liked and sought after by both Wrigley and Veeck. When you look at his contribution to baseball as a manager and player, it’s pretty special.

  17. Rowan Campbell
    October 24th, 2009 at 7:23 am #

    I think Charlie Grimm should be elected to the hall of fame.
    He was a great first baseman and one of the best managers ever.
    He won 9 fielding titles at first base and 3 penats as a manager.
    I would vote for him.
    Iam a huge Chicago Cubs fan.

  18. LestersLegends
    October 24th, 2009 at 7:30 am #

    Larry & Rowan – I agree. He was special and should be acknowledged for his contribution to baseball.

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